CFP: Multiplied and Modified, Warsaw, 28-29 June 2018

CFP: Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries.

International conference, University of Warsaw and the National Museum in Warsaw
Conference: 28-29 June 2018
Deadline: 15 January 2018

Keynote speakers:

Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)
Suzanne Karr Schmidt (The Newberry, Chicago)

The production of printed image consists of a multiplication of a particular design, whereas the consumption and reception of single impressions often involve various modifications. Multiple, but virtually identical woodcuts or engravings reproduce and thus disseminate the original composition, while at the same time they have lives of their own. They have been placed in various contexts, coloured, trimmed, framed, pasted into books and onto other objects. The place of prints in both visual and material culture of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries is a continuously growing field in recent scholarship. However, these studies usually focus on the most prominent centres of production situated in Italy, the Low Countries, France and the Empire. The principal aim of the conference Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries is to contribute to the research on the beginning and early development of the graphic arts from the perspective of the beholder, while broadening geographically the field of inquiry, i.e. by shifting the emphasis to the regions of Central Europe, the British Isles, the Iberian Peninsula, Dalmatia, as well as considering the reception of the European prints on other continents.
Possible topics include but are not limited to:
– Practices of consumption of printed images (owners and beholders, reasons for their interest in printed images; collecting and connoisseurship; printed images in public spaces and in households)
– Printed images in the early modern iconography and contemporary written sources
– Print market, copyright and censorship; printed images in confessional disputes
– Reproductive function of printed images and modifications, adaptations and transformations of original designs, matrices and single impressions
– Printmaking and bookmaking  (role of illustrations in printed books as compared with handwritten illuminated codices; illustrated books and broadsheets, written commentaries to woodcuts and engravings)
We invite proposals from scholars of all disciplines working on the history of print culture.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length and will be followed by a ten-minute Q&A session.

Please e-mail an abstract of no more than 300 words to Magdalena Herman (multipliedandmodified@uw.edu.pl) by January 15, 2018.

Along with your abstract please include your name, institution, paper title and a brief biography of no more than 200 words. Successful applicants will be notified by February 19, 2018. Please indicate whether you would be interested in further developing your paper for a publication.

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CONF: Surrealism in the United States, Paris, 27-29 November 2017

Conference: Networks, Museums and Collections. Surrealism in the United States
When: 27-29 November 2017
Where: Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte, Hôtel Lully, 45, rue des Petits Champs, F-75001 Paris
More information at: info@dfk-paris.org; www.dfk-paris.org

With the Support of the Terra Foundation for American Art

Academic advisory board:
Julia Drost (Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris)
Fabrice Flahutez (Université Paris Nanterre)
Anne Helmreich (College of Fine Arts, Texas Christian University)
Susan Power (Independent Scholar, Los Angeles)
Martin Schieder (Universität Leipzig)

Monday, November 27, 2017

14h30    Welcome
Thomas Kirchner (Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris)

14h45    Introduction
Julia Drost (DFK Paris)
Anne Helmreich (College of Fine Arts, Texas Christian University)

I.    Private / Public
Moderator: Martin Schieder (Universität Leipzig)

15h00    Peggy Guggenheim: Surrealist Collector Extraordinaire
Susan Davidson (Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York)

15h45    Collecting Modern Art in Hartford. James Thrall Soby and the Wadsworth Atheneum
Oliver Tostmann (Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford)

16.30    On the Same Team: Alexander Iolas and the de Menils
Clare Elliott (The Menil Collection, Houston, Texas)

18.30    Evening lecture
Surrealism and The Museum of Modern Art: “A Serious Affair”
Anne Umland (The Museum of Modern Art, New York)

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

II.    The Making of Surrealism in the US
Moderator: Anne Helmreich (College of Fine Arts, Texas Christian
University)

10h00    The Museum of Modern Art and the Marketing of Surrealism
Sandra Zalman (University of Houston)

10h45    Towards a New “Human Consciousness”. The Exhibition Adventures in Surrealist Painting during the last four Years at the New School for Social Research of New York, March 1941
Caterina Caputo (University of Florence)

12h00    Bringing the War Front to Stateside Patrons: First Papers of Surrealism and its First Audience
James Housefield (University of California, Davis)

12h45    Surrealistic Socialite. Dalí’s Portrait Exhibition at the Knoedler Galleries in 1943
Martin Schieder (Universität Leipzig)

III.    Agents / Artists
Moderator: Julia Drost (DFK Paris)

15h00    La retenue et le calcul. Marcel Duchamp promoteur de son art aux États-Unis
Scarlett Reliquet (Musée d’Orsay, Paris)

15h45    René Magritte in the United States. Between Art and Business
Julie Waseige (Independent Scholar, Brussels)

17h00    Woman House. Louise Bourgeois, the Norlyst Gallery, and Feminist Surrealism in America, 1943–1947
Daniel Belasco (Al Held Foundation, New York)

17h45    Bloodflames 1947: Nicolas Calas’s Eccentric Position
Effie Rentzou (Princeton University)

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

IV.    Galleries / Dealers
Moderator: Fabrice Flahutez (Université Paris Nanterre)

10h00    Julien Levy: Progressive Dealer or Dealer of Progressives?
Anne Helmreich (College of Fine Arts, Texas Christian University)

10h45    Surrealism on the Rise: The Copley Galleries and Joseph Cornell in Hollywood
Timea Andrea Lelik (Universiteit Leiden)

12h00    The Galería de Arte Mexicano and Networks of Mexican Surrealism in the United States
Rachel Kaplan (Los Angeles County Museum of Art)

12h45    Surrealist Intrusion and Disenchantment on Madison Avenue, 1960
Susan Power (Independent Scholar, Los Angeles)

V.    American Surrealism
Moderator: Susan Power (Independent Scholar, Los Angeles)

15h00    Surrealism and the Marketing of Man Ray’s Photographs in America: The Medium, the Message, and the Tastemakers
Wendy Grossman (The Phillips Collection, Washington)

15h45    The Poetics of Surrealist Presentation: Joseph Cornell, Robert Motherwell, and Leo Castelli
Mary Ann Caws (Graduate School, City University of New York)

16h30    D’Arcy Galleries and New York Late Surrealism: Duchamp, Johns, Rauschenberg
Lewis C. Kachur (Kean University of New Jersey)

Conclusion

The conference “Networks, Museums and Collections. Surrealism in the United States” will bring the complex networks that fostered and sustained Surrealism in North America into academic focus. Who – collectors, critics, dealers, galleries, and other types of mediating agents – supported the artists in the Surrealist orbit, in what ways and why? What more can be learned about high profile collectors such as the de Menils in Houston or Peggy Guggenheim in New York? Compared to their peers in Europe, did artists in the United States use similarly spectacular strategies of publicity and mediation? In what networks did the commercial galleries operate, domestically and internationally, and how did they dialogue with museums? Were American artists included in the musealization of Surrealism in American museums as had occurred with the Parisian circle, or were they, on the contrary, excluded from this development? Divided into five sections (I. Private / Public; II. The Making of Surrealism in the US; III. Agents / Artists; IV. Galleries / Dealers; V. American Surrealism), the conference will offer an innovative and lasting contribution to research and scholarship on the history of art in America while focusing specifically on the expansion and reception of Surrealism in the United States. The conference is a key component of the research project “Le surréalisme et l’argent. Galeries, collectionneurs et médiateurs” in cooperation with the labex arts H2H, which explores to what extent the global success of Surrealism in the 20th century was due to the roles and factors played by private collectors, museums, exhibitions, art collectors as well as the commercial strategies of artists.

See also:
https://dfk-paris.org/fr/research-project/le-surréalisme-et-l’argent-galeries-collectionneurs-et-médiateurs-971.html
http://www.labex-arts-h2h.fr/le-surrealisme-au-regard-des-1063.html?lang=fr

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SEM: Displaying “German Greatness” in Nazi Germany: the Exhibition Deutsche Größe (1940-1942) and its Legacy, London, 20 November 2017

When: 20 November 2017, 6pm
Where: Pollard Seminar Room N301, Third Floor, Institute of Historical Research,  Senate House, Malet St, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HU
Open to all, no need to book.
More Information at: http://www.collectinganddisplay.com/seminar_programme.html

Although it is not well known to scholars, the cultural-historical exhibition Deutsche Größe (“German Greatness” or “Grandeur”) was probably the most important museum display of the Nazi era. The show’s subject was the history of Germany from the early Middle Ages until the assumption of power by Adolf Hitler. Deutsche Größe was supported at the highest levels of the Nazi Party and its presentation of history was frankly ideological, but the show expressed that ideology through a series of ambitious and innovative display techniques. One of these was the use of an elaborate interior architecture for each of the show’s fifteen chronologically-arranged galleries, an architecture which was intended to give the feeling of the period on display in each gallery. Even more remarkable from the museological perspective was the exhibition’s exclusive use of facsimiles (most of them hand made) for the exhibition of its close to 2000 objects.

This paper presents Deutsche Größe and describes how it came about and how it worked to shape an understanding of history that would serve Nazi goals. Special attention is paid to Deutsche Größe as a piece of museology and to the display of the art and culture of the high Middle Ages, an area of history that was especially fraught and problematic for the National Socialists because it came from the “First” Reich that they saw revived in their “Third” Reich. The paper ends with a consideration of the legacy of Deutsche Größe in two later exhibitions, one which took place in Cold War West Germany and the other in the German Federal Republic after unification.

About the Speaker:

William J. Diebold, Jane Neuberger Goodsell Professor of Art History and Humanities, Reed College, Portland, Oregon USA

Professor Diebold was awarded his PhD in 1989, at Johns Hopkins University. Thesis (with honors): “The Artistic Patronage of Charles the Bald.” Since September, 1987, he has been a member of the Art History and Humanities Faculty at Reed College, Portland, Oregon. He has been a member of the Editorial Board of Studies in Iconography since 2015. Following the award of a grant, in Spring 2018, he will be a member of the School of Historical Studies, at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.

 

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CFP: Connoisseurship and the Knowledge of Art in the Netherlands, 1400 to the present

CALL FOR PAPERS
NEDERLANDS KUNSTHISTORISCH JAARBOEK
VOL. 69, 2019
Connoisseurship and the Knowledge of Art in the Netherlands, 1400 to the present

Connoisseurship has long been suspect. Though essential to the study of material objects, it has been opposed to the more ‘substantive’ discipline of academic art history, and reviled as outmoded and elitist, as tainted by the market, and as concerned merely with such artist-reifying/mystifying issues as attribution, authenticity and the autograph ‘hand’. The connoisseur – with typically his ‘eye’ – has been dismissed as a dinosaur.
Yet, the practice of connoisseurship has continued apace – indeed, has been reinvented – in print rooms and museums, in the venues of the art market, and in the monographic projects, large and small, that have catalogued and re-catalogued the works of major and minor masters, now with the aid of ever changing methods of technical investigation. In the Netherlands, the Rembrandt Research Project; seven-volume Rembrandt: The New Hollstein, of 2013; and Corpus Rubenianum have relied on and advanced the methods of connoisseurship. So too have such collaborative investigative initiatives as the Bosch Project and Lasting Support: An Interdisciplinary Research Project to Assess the Structural Condition of the Ghent Altarpiece, which led to the cleaning of Van Eyck’s masterpiece.

Recently, moreover, connoisseurship has been historicized and theorized. Recognizing early modern connoisseurship as a kind of knowledge-based expertise that was the purview of kunstkenners and liefhebbers (art lovers), as opposed to naamkoopers (name buyers), has shed light on historical notions of authenticity, originality, quality, style, judgment, and discernment, as well as on the practices of art making and collecting, of workshop practices and collaboration. Understood in the context of its historical development, and through such early interlocutors as Van Mander, Van Hoogstraten, De Lairesse, Bosse, and De Piles, connoisseurship takes on new dimensions, as do its problematic aspects, such as its association with the practices (and malpractices) of art dealers. Theorized as a method of visual analysis, connoisseurship has been given new life – as a ‘new connoisseurship’ – in its association with technical art history and the scientific investigation of works of art, with intuition and neuroscience, as well as with the computational analysis of large data sets.

This volume of the NKJ seeks proposals that explore the connoisseurship – and the connoisseur – of Netherlandish art by bringing together new research into their history, recent practice, and conceptualization. Questions to consider include, but are not limited to:
– What is the relation between connoisseurship and our understanding of style, quality, and the history of taste, and of concepts of the artist?
– How can new insights into early modern artistic practices, and into the attitudes of painters, kenners and liefhebbers towards authorship, impact present day practices of attribution and notions of ‘authentic’ or ‘autograph’ works?
– How can we think about connoisseurship across media?
– Are interpretations of the results of technical investigations nothing other than classical connoisseurship? Or do these apparently objective methods make connoisseurship rooted in the personal experience of the connoisseur obsolete?
– Can the ‘new connoisseurship’ raise new questions and alter the traditional goals and objectives of connoisseurship?
– Can cognitive and neuro-scientific research provide evidence about how and why connoisseurship works?
– How are seeing and knowing related, and how were they considered to be related in the past?
– What is the future of connoisseurship and do we need a better term for these practices?

The NKJ is dedicated to a particular theme each year and promotes innovative scholarship and articles that employ a diversity of approaches to the study of Netherlandish art in its wider context. For more information, see
http://www.brill.com/publications/netherlands-yearbook-history-art-nederlands-kunsthistorisch-jaarboek

Contributions to the NKJ (in Dutch, English, German or French) are limited to a maximum of 7,500 words, excluding notes and bibliography. Following a peer review process and receipt of the complete text, the editorial board will make final decisions on the acceptance of papers.

Please send a 500-word proposal and a short CV to the volume editors by January 15, 2018:

H. Perry Chapman pchapman@udel.edu
Dulcia Meijers Dulcia_Meijers@emerson.edu

Schedule:
15 January 2018: Deadline for submission of proposals.
February 2018: Notifications about proposals.
1 May 2018: Deadline for submission of first drafts.
August 2018: Comments by reviewers and editors to contributors.
December 2018: Final drafts.
Spring 2019: Images ready, copy editing, print proofs for correction.
Winter 2019: Publication.

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CFP: Ephemeral Exhibition Spaces (1750-1918), Geneva, 16-17 March 2018

CFP: Ephemeral Exhibition Spaces, 1750-1918 (Geneva, 16-17 Mar 18)
Geneva, March 16 – 17, 2018
Deadline: Dec 1, 2017

During the last decades of the Ancien Régime and throughout the long nineteenth century, people in Europe marveled at absent worlds or past events that were reenacted visually or mentally in a variety of ephemeral exhibition spaces, like temporal museums, exhibits, (private) cabinets and, most strikingly, panoramic theaters and dioramic constructions. The latter installations or decors visually imitated reality, rather than represent it, like art would do, and with their illusory optical effects they were very popular with the big audience. They were however also criticised by those who stressed the imaginative, mental nature of vivification against forms of visual mimicry. From the very outset, reenactment in these spaces comes forward as an ambiguous, multifaceted and conflictive strategy.

In the new public and private spaces of the nineteenth century, ephemeral exhibition spaces or spaces with an exhibitional dimension par excellence fitted more encompassing epistemological and experiential strategies of reenactment. Within a wide scope of cultural practices, they provided new spatial frameworks of understanding and experiencing reality, of imagining, of identification and control. It is however still a matter of debate how the epistemological, visual and experiential dimensions of reenactment interrelated, conflicted and coincided in these spaces. Reenactment in ephemeral exhibition spaces was caught between visual and mental strategies, between material tangibility and imagination. Reenactment in these spaces was also at the same time a tool of (scientific) knowledge and of subjective experience. Imagination could in this context strongly relate to the sensation of the uncanny, to aesthetic rapture, to (ideological and political) identification and to personal memory or even, in particular cases, to solipsist isolation. These spaces, finally, precisely because of their exhibitional nature, are also revealing of a dynamic of control, of voyeurism, of a problematic dealing with otherness, difference and absence, of people, of cultures or of the past.

Our symposium intends to discuss a wide variety of ephemeral exhibition spaces or spaces with a distinctively exhibitional dimension, such as for example dépôts, derelict gardens, ruins, boudoirs, museums, exhibits, private interiors, cabinets, antique stores… against a broad cultural background and treated from various interdisciplinary angles within the humanities, including cultural history, history of art, literary studies and comparative literature, intellectual history, material culture studies, museum studies and others.

We particularly, but certainly not exclusively, welcome papers, either in English or in French, on the following topics:

– Ambiguous, multifunctional, liminal or hybrid spaces, in-between spaces, spaces between public and private uses, as well as the cultural practices they are connected with.

– Imagery spaces, for example in written or visual sources (literature, catalogues, guides, travel literature, letters, art, images etc.) or material spaces that are able to stage the role of the imaginary in the construction of cultural practices.

– Mediating spaces that worked as catalysts for interaction and interrelation between a number of cate- gories such as gender and social classes.

There is no registration fee for the conference

Final papers, either in French or English, will be published in an edited volume with a reputable editor.

Proposals (maximum 250 words) have to be sent to Camilla Murgia (camilla.murgia@unige.ch) and Dominique Bauer (dominique.bauer@kuleuven.be) by December 1, 2017. Those who submitted their proposal will be notified of their acceptance by December 20

Conveners: Dr. Camilla Murgia, University of Geneva and Prof. Dominique Bauer, Catholic University of Leuven

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CFP: Art with (or without) the art market, Paris, 24 February 2018

CFP: Art with (or without) the art market (Paris, 24 Feb 18)
Where: INHA, Paris
Deadline: Dec 1, 2017

Symposium: “Art with (or without) the Art Market”
This call for papers will lead to a symposium and a publication as a thematic issue of Marges, revue d’art contemporain.

The art market has steadily increased in last decades, up to a point where many observers tend to doubt it could ever go back to its initial state. Contemporary art is at the centre of this phenomenon and seems to be feeding the appetites of investors for whom art value escapes by its very nature the ordinary fluctuations of general economic tendencies. It is however difficult to believe that such
values are adorned with magic properties: if there is an art market boom, it is not for purely artistic reasons and it has more to do with a group of factors, the most important being economic speculation. Knowing that money has a central role in the imagination of most people, the question has to be asked whether it is still possible to talk about art without mentioning the vast sums it requires.
How does the relation between monetary and aesthetic evaluation function? It is indeed difficult to believe that the art market’s recent growth is without consequences on positions within a field of art where income and social positions inequalities are so important. This leads inevitably to questions regarding the relations between aesthetic value and market listings.
The hyperbolic development of the contemporary art market has consequences on the postures and the practices of most of players of the field, beginning with the artists themselves. In the past, quite a few used to ostentatiously despise the art market; it was one of the well-known postures of Bohemia. In recent times this situation seems however to have changed: if there is still a large number of
poor artists, others choose to stage spectacularly their luxurious way of life and good fortunes. This posturing evokes ancient art history, and at the same time it contradicts largely modernity’s puritanical ethos. In any case, one must admit that commercial success is no longer seen as a sign of mediocrity and/or treason by critics, art historians, museum and exhibition curators. Press
releases issued by commercial galleries have for example gained a respectability that goes well beyond plain information and everyone strives to spread around their content. Some galleries occupy a central position in the art world, at the same level as the main artistic institutions, and it can be seen in the way major events are programmed (art fairs, retrospective exhibitions).
What should one think of this situation: has the market really become the main arbiter of artistic values? Have we reached a point where it becomes unthinkable to oppose a system that does not benefit to all but which continue to attract artists – and up to the neo-liberal economy which strongly increase the values linked to the art world  ? Does the market determine the evolution of artistic
practices, how and by which ways?

Possible axes of reflexion:

— The effects of the art markets’ growth on artistic practices;
— The relation between the market, institutions programming and the elaboration of critical texts…;
— The evolution of the art market in recent decades. Its contemporary condition;
— Different sections of the art market; their creation and recent evolution;
— Practices (by artists, theoreticians, critics or activists) that seek to create alternatives to the art market;
— Economic relations within the art world;
— The question of the pressure made by money and the need of visibility in higher education in art;
— Artistic creation informed by economic topics.

This call for papers will lead to a symposium and a publication as a thematic issue of the art journal Marges. Propositions should be sent in the form of an abstract explaining the topic of the paper (800 words maximum), before December 1st, 2017, by email, at the following address: jerome.glicenstein@univ-paris8.fr

Selected propositions (by double blind reviews) will participate in the symposium on February 24th, 2018, at INHA in Paris. The selected texts will have to be transmitted before 15 February (6500 words maximum) and they might be published in Marges #28, released in March 2019.

Marges (Presses Universitaires de Vincennes) emphasizes the work of young scholars of fields concerned by themes such as aesthetics, fine arts, theatre and film studies, musicology, sociology, art history, etc.

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CONF: Circulating Crafts, Paris, 24 January 2018, and Los Angeles, 21 February 2018

Conference: Circulating Crafts: Art, Agency, and the Making of Identities (1600-2000)

Where: Paris, Workshop at La Colonie (24 January 2018)/ Los Angeles, CAA 2-parts Session (21 February 18)

Organized by Yaëlle Biro, Metropolitan Museum of Art; and Noémie Étienne, Bern Universität (Visiting Professor at Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

PART 1 Workshop “Circulating Crafts”
January 24th 2018, La Colonie, 178 boulevard Lafayette, 75010 Paris

9.00: Welcome and Introduction, Yaëlle Biro and Noémie Étienne

9.15: Ariane Fennetaux, Université Paris Diderot
From Coromandel with Love: The Glocalisation of Indian Cottons in the 17th and 18th Centuries

9.55: Chonja Lee, Universität Bern
Made in Switzerland: How Swiss Indiennes became Autochtone and Dressed the World at the same Time

10.35: Aziza Gril-Mariotte, Université de Haute-Alsace
Modèles, emprunts et circulation des formes occidentales dans les toiles peintes au XVIIIe siècle

11.15: COFFEE BREAK

11.30: James Green, University of East Anglia
Appropriating Kongo Colors: Red, White and Black in 19th Century English Trade Cloth

12.10: Manuel Charpy, CNRS, Lille
Changing Sides? Consumption and Political Uses of Western Clothing in Congo (1830-1960)

Moderation: Noémie Étienne, Universität Bern /Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

13.00-14.00: LUNCH BREAK

14.00: Thomas Grillot, CNRS, Paris
Marketing Family Heirlooms: Three Generations of American Indian Artists in the Northern Plains

14.40:  Rémi Labrusse, Université Paris-Nanterre
Hybridité et identité en Algérie à la veille de l’invasion française : Le cas du palais du Bey de Constantine

15.20: COFFEE BREAK

15.35: Julien Volper, Tervuren Museum
Du Bénin à l’Inde en passant par le Congo. Origines, influences et voyages d’objets africains du XIXème et du XXème siècles

16.15: Jonathan Fine, Ethnologisches Museum, Berlin
Crafting Culture: The Co-Production of “Bamum” Art in the 1920s

16.55: Gaëlle Beaujean, Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac
Sirène, vierge, charmeuse de serpent et Atlantique

17.35-18.00: DISSCUSSION

Moderation: Yaëlle Biro, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Participation to the workshop is free, open to all, without registration.

PART 2. Conference Panels “Art, Agency, and the Making of Identities (1600-2000)”
February 21st 2018, CAA, College Art Association
Convention Center, 1201 S Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90015

Panel I, 2:00-3:30pm, Room 405

Helen Glaister, SOAS, University of London/Victoria and Albert Museum, London
The Picturesque in Peking – European Decoration at the Qing Court

Dorothy Armstrong, Royal College of Art/Victoria and Albert Museum, London
A Transnational Loop: Pakistan’s Repossession of the Oriental Carpet Imaginary and its Production

Tingting Xu, University of Chicago
The Rivers Folded: Souvenir Accordion Panoramas in the Late Nineteenth-century Global Tourism

Karen E. Milbourne, Smithsonian National Museum of African Art
Lozi Style: King Lewanika and the Marketing of Barotseland

Panel II, 4:00-5:30pm, Room 409A

Ashley V. Miller, UC Berkeley
‘What is Colonial Art, and Can it be Modern?’: Moroccan Modernisms at the Art Deco Exposition in Paris, 1925

Victoria L. Rovine, University of North Carolina
A Wider Loom: Textiles and Colonial Politics of Authenticity in the Soudan Français

Gail Levin, The City University of New York
Frida Kahlo’s Invention of Jewish Identity

Niko Vicario, Amherst College
From Duco to Comex: The Politics of Synthetic Paint in the Americas

Circulation and imitation of cultural products are key factors in shaping the material world – as well as identities. Many objects or techniques that came to be seen as local, authentic, and typical are in fact entangled in complex transnational narratives tied to a history of imperialism, and the commercial phenomenon of supply and demand. In the 17th and 18th centuries, artists and craftspeople in Europe appropriated foreign techniques such as porcelain, textiles, or lacquers that eventually shaped local European identities. During the 19th century, Western consumers looked for genuine goods produced outside of industry, and the demand of Bourgeois tourism created a new market of authentic souvenirs and forgeries alike. Furthermore, the 20th century saw the (re)-emergence of local “Schools” of art and crafts as responses to political changes, anthropological research, and/or tourist demand. This multi-parts conference will explore how technical knowledge, immaterial desires, and political agendas impacted the production and consumption of visual and material culture in different times and places. A new scrutiny of this back and forth between demanders and suppliers will allow us to map anew a multidirectional market for cultural goods in which the source countries could be positioned at the center.

Contact: yaelle.biro@metmuseum.orgnoemie.etienne@ikg.unibe.ch

This conference is made possible by Tribal Art Magazine and the Swiss National Science Foundation. More on: www.theexotic.ch

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CONF: Lo specchio del gusto. Vittorio Cini e il collezionismo d’arte antica nel Novecento, Venice, 14 November 2017

Conference: Lo specchio del gusto. Vittorio Cini e il collezionismo d’arte antica nel Novecento
Where: Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Venezia

When: 14 November 2017

Programme

9.30
SALUTI

Giovanni Bazoli
Presidente della Fondazione Giorgio Cini

Luca Massimo Barbero
Direttore dell’Istituto di Storia dell’Arte
della Fondazione Giorgio Cini

10.00
VITTORIO CINI COLLEZIONISTA

Presiede Andrea De Marchi

Alvar González-Palacios
Un ritratto di Vittorio Cini

Maurizio Reberschak
Vittorio Cini, uomo del “secolo breve”

Stefano Bruzzese
Per Vittorio Cini collezionista: il rapporto
con Bernard Berenson

11.30 – 12.00 | PAUSA

Antonella Chiodo
Due ferraresi a Venezia. Vittorio Cini,
Nino Barbantini e la loro idea di collezione

Mauro Natale
Vittorio Cini e Federico Zeri

14.30
Presiede Mauro Natale

Andrea De Marchi
Vittorio Cini collezionista di primitivi
tra Bernard Berenson e Federico Zeri

15.00
IL COLLEZIONISMO
AL TEMPO DI VITTORIO CINI

Andrea Bardelli
Guido Cagnola (1861-1954) collezionista
per natura, umanista per vocazione

Annamaria Bava
La collezione d’arte antica di Riccardo Gualino
(1879-1964) alla Galleria Sabauda

16.00 – 16.30 | PAUSA

Bozena Anna Kowalczyk
Aldo Crespi (1885-1978) collezionista.
L’intervista alla figlia Giulia Maria

Anna Orlando
Angelo Costa (1901-1976) e la riscoperta
del Barocco genovese negli anni di Vittorio Cini

Informazioni:
Istituto di Storia dell’Arte
Fondazione Giorgio Cini onlus
T +39 041 2710230
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CONF: Global Power of Private Museums Berlin, 16-18 November 17

Conference: The Global Power of Private Museums: Arts and Publics – States and Markets

When: 16-18 November 2017

Where: Berlin, Technische Universität Berlin / 16-17 Nov. 2017 and Forum Transregionale Studien / 18 Nov. 2017

From: Dorothee Wimmer <dorothee.wimmer@tu-berlin.de>

[German version below]

The history of state or public museums has been the focus of numerous symposiums and publications. Yet astonishingly little research has taken private museums in consideration, even though the number of private art museums has risen dramatically over the past two decades. According to the International Council of Museums (ICOM), there are now more private museum spaces in the world than public ones. The majority of these museums are in China, South Korea, the US and Germany, though private museums have been established also in Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Egypt, France, India, Indonesia, Russia, Turkey and Ukraine, among other countries.

At this year’s international symposium of the Centre for Art Market Studies at TU Berlin – organised in cooperation with the Forum Transregionale Studien and its research programme Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices – participants will be exploring the background, mechanisms and consequences of a phenomenon that may be referred to as the „global power of private museums“.

PROGRAMME

THURSDAY, 16/11/2017
Venue: TU Berlin, Senate Room H 1035/1036, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin

18:00 Registration

18:15 Welcome and introduction:
Bénédicte Savoy (Berlin / Paris)
Dorothee Wimmer (Berlin)
Julia Voss (Göttingen / Lüneburg)

PANEL DISCUSSION: State/Public/Private Museums: Challenges and Dynamics in a Global Art World

18:30 On the Podium:
Hannah Baader (Florenz / Berlin)
Axel Haubrok (Berlin)
Christiane Lange (Stuttgart)
Sonja Mejcher-Atassi (Beirut / Berlin)

Moderation: Julia Voss (Göttingen / Lüneburg)

19:30 Reception

FRIDAY, 17/11/2017
Venue: TU Berlin, Senate Room H 1035/1036, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin

10:00 Registration

10:30 Welcome and introduction:
Dorothee Wimmer (Berlin)
Julia Voss (Göttingen / Lüneburg)

SECTION 1: Old Fashion – new Branding? The “Privatization” of Art Museums in Europe
Chair: Dorothee Wimmer (Berlin)

10:45 Anja Grebe (Krems)
The Politics of Public-Private Partnerships: Museum Case Studies from Germany and Austria

11:15 Ronit Milano (Be’er Scheva)
The Power of the Brand: The Economic Instrumentality of Private Museums in France and Ukraine

11:45 Coffee Break

12:00 Waltraud M. Bayer (Wien)
Private Art Museums in post-Soviet Russia

12:30 Kathryn Brown (Loughborough)
The Privatization of Public Museum Culture and the Future of Art History

13:00 Lunch Break

SECTION 2: Public-Private Partnerships? Global / Local Museum Centres
Chair: Georges Khalil (Berlin)

15:00 Oscar Salemink (Copenhagen)
City of Art: State, Market, Museums and the Urban Reinvention of Shanghai

15:30 Deepti Mulgund (New Dehli)
To the Nation, to the World? Two Moments of Museum-Making in India

16:00 Maurício Barros de Castro (Rio de Janeiro)
The Global/Local Power of the Inhotim Institute: contemporary art, and private museums in Brazil

16:30 Coffee Break

KEYNOTE LECTURE

18:00 Wendy Shaw (Berlin)
Privatizing the Republic: Museums, Markets, and Global Ambitions in Contemporary Turkey

SATURDAY, 18/11/2017
Venue: Forum Transregionale Studien, Seminar Room, Wallotstraße 14, 14193 Berlin

10:00 Welcome and introduction:
Hannah Baader (Florenz / Berlin)
Georges Khalil (Berlin)

SECTION 3: Politics and Cultural Properties: Private Museums in Context
Chair: Hannah Baader (Florenz / Berlin)

10:15 Reema Salha Fadda (Oxford)
Towards a Transnational Museum? Negotiating the Political Economy of Cultural Production in Palestine

10:45 Mai Lin Tjoa-Bonatz (Frankfurt am Main) / Filemon Hulu (Gunungsitoli)
Manifestations of Cultural Property: Private Community Museums in Indonesia

11:15 Coffee Break

11:30 Peggy Levitt (Boston)
The Imagined Globe: Remapping the World Through Public Diplomacy at the Asia Society

12:00 Matthew Elliott Gillman (New York)
Custodians, Collections, Communities: The Aga Khan Museum in Toronto

12:30 Stephennie Mulder (Austin / Berlin)
Some Remarks on Private and Public Art Crime and Trade in Times of War

13:00 Close of the Symposium

Convenors: Forum Kunst und Markt / Centre for Art Market Studies, Institute of Art History and Historical Urban Studies at Technische Universität Berlin, department of Modern Art History, in cooperation with the Forum Transregionale Studien and its research programme Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices

Concept: Dorothee Wimmer (Forum Kunst und Markt / Centre for Art Market Studies) | Julia Voss (Fellow of the Lichtenberg Kolleg, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen / Leuphana Universität Lüneburg) | Hannah Baader (Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices / Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz), Georges Khalil (Forum Transregionale Studien)

Venues: Technische Universität Berlin, Senate Room H 1035/1036, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (16-17/11/2017) | Forum Transregionale Studien, Seminar Room, Wallotstraße 14, 14193 Berlin (18/11/2017)

Additional Information: Admission is free. No registration required but space is limited. Conference language is English.

_____________

Technische Universität Berlin / 16.-17. Nov. 2017
Forum Transregionale Studien / 18. Nov. 2017

Während die Geschichte des öffentlichen Museums Gegenstand zahlreicher Tagungen und Publikationen geworden ist, wurde die des Privatmuseums bisher erstaunlich wenig erforscht. Und dies, obwohl die Zahl der privaten Kunstmuseen in den vergangenen zwei Jahrzehnten dramatisch gestiegen ist. Laut ICOM (International Council of Museums) gibt es inzwischen weltweit mehr private als öffentliche Museumsinstitutionen. Die Mehrzahl davon befindet sich in den Vereinigten Staaten, Südkorea, Deutschland und China. Neugründungen sind aber auch in Ägypten, Brasilien, Dänemark, Frankreich, Indien, Indonesien, Kanada, Russland, in der Türkei und der Ukraine erfolgt, um nur einige Länger zu nennen.

Im diesjährigen internationalen Symposium des Forums Kunst und Markt / Centre for Art Market Studies an der TU Berlin, das in Kooperation mit dem Forum Transregionale Studien und seinem Forschungsprogramm Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices stattfindet, soll nach den Hintergründen, Mechanismen und Folgen des Phänomens der „global power of private museums“ gefragt werden.

PROGRAMM

DONNERSTAG, 16/11/2017
Ort: TU Berlin, Senatssitzungssaal H 1035/1036, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin

18:00 Anmeldung

18:15 Begrüßung und Einführung:
Bénédicte Savoy (Berlin / Paris)
Dorothee Wimmer (Berlin)
Julia Voss (Göttingen / Lüneburg)

PODIUMSDISKUSSION: State/Public/Private Museums: Challenges and Dynamics in a Global Art World

18:30 Auf dem Podium:
Hannah Baader (Florenz / Berlin)
Axel Haubrok (Berlin)
Christiane Lange (Stuttgart)
Sonja Mejcher-Atassi (Beirut / Berlin)

Moderation: Julia Voss (Göttingen / Lüneburg)

19:30 Empfang

FREITAG, 17/11/2017
Ort: TU Berlin, Senatssitzungssaal H 1035/1036, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin

10:00 Anmeldung

10:30 Begrüßung und Einführung:
Dorothee Wimmer (Berlin)
Julia Voss (Göttingen / Lüneburg)

SECTION 1: Old Fashion – new Branding? The “Privatization” of Art Museums in Europe
Moderation: Dorothee Wimmer (Berlin)

10:45 Anja Grebe (Krems)
The Politics of Public-Private Partnerships: Museum Case Studies from Germany and Austria

11:15 Ronit Milano (Be’er Scheva)
The Power of the Brand: The Economic Instrumentality of Private Museums in France and Ukraine

11:45 Kaffeepause

12:00 Waltraud M. Bayer (Wien)
Private Art Museums in post-Soviet Russia

12:30 Kathryn Brown (Loughborough)
The Privatization of Public Museum Culture and the Future of Art History

13:00 Mittagspause

SECTION 2: Public-Private Partnerships? Global / Local Museum Centres
Moderation: Georges Khalil (Berlin)

15:00 Oscar Salemink (Copenhagen)
City of Art: State, Market, Museums and the Urban Reinvention of Shanghai

15:30 Deepti Mulgund (New Dehli)
To the Nation, to the World? Two Moments of Museum-Making in India

16:00 Maurício Barros de Castro (Rio de Janeiro)
The Global/Local Power of the Inhotim Institute: contemporary art, and private museums in Brazil

16:30 Kaffepause

ABENDVORTRAG

18:00 Wendy Shaw (Berlin)
Privatizing the Republic: Museums, Markets, and Global Ambitions in Contemporary Turkey

SAMSTAG, 18/11/2017
Ort: Forum Transregionale Studien, Seminarraum, Wallotstraße 14, 14193 Berlin

10:00 Begrüßung:
Hannah Baader (Florenz / Berlin)
Georges Khalil (Berlin)

SECTION 3: Politics and Cultural Properties: Private Museums in Context
Moderation: Hannah Baader (Florenz / Berlin)

10:15 Reema Salha Fadda (Oxford)
Towards a Transnational Museum? Negotiating the Political Economy of Cultural Production in Palestine

10:45 Mai Lin Tjoa-Bonatz (Frankfurt am Main) / Filemon Hulu (Gunungsitoli)
Manifestations of Cultural Property: Private Community Museums in Indonesia

11:15 Kaffeepause

11:30 Peggy Levitt (Boston)
The Imagined Globe: Remapping the World Through Public Diplomacy at the Asia Society

12:00 Matthew Elliott Gillman (New York)
Custodians, Collections, Communities: The Aga Khan Museum in Toronto

12:30 Stephennie Mulder (Austin / Berlin)
Some Remarks on Private and Public Art Crime and Trade in Times of War

13:00 Ende des Symposiums

Veranstalter: Forum Kunst und Markt / Centre for Art Market Studies,
Institut für Kunstwissenschaft und Historische Urbanistik der Technischen Universität Berlin, Fachgebiet Kunstgeschichte der Moderne, in Kooperation mit dem Forum Transregionale Studien und seinem Forschungsprogramm Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices

Konzept: Dorothee Wimmer (Forum Kunst und Markt / Centre for Art Market Studies) | Julia Voss (Fellow of the Lichtenberg Kolleg, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen / Leuphana Universität Lüneburg) | Hannah Baader (Art Histories and Aesthetic Practices / Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz), Georges Khalil (Forum Transregionale Studien)

Orte: Technische Universität Berlin, Senate Room H 1035/1036, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (16-17/11/2017) | Forum Transregionale Studien, Seminar Room, Wallotstraße 14, 14193 Berlin (18/11/2017)

Weitere Informationen: Der Eintritt ist frei, eine Anmeldung nicht erforderlich. Die Anzahl der Plätze ist begrenzt. Die Konferenzsprache ist Englisch.

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CONF: Sammler, Sammlungen, Sammlungskulturen, Vienna, 24 November 2017

Conference: Sammler, Sammlungen, Sammlungskulturen in Wien und Mitteleuropa

Where: University of Vienna, Institut für Kunstgeschichte.

When: 24 November 2017

Programm:

9:00 Prof. Dr. Sebastian Schütze (Universität Wien)
Begrüßung und Einführung: Das Vienna Center for the History of Collecting

Sektionsleitung: Dr. Christian Huemer
(Belvedere Research Center, Wien)
9:30 Dr. Cecilia Mazzetti di Pietralata (Università di Chieti/
Bibliotheca Hertziana): La quadreria del cardinale Nicolò del Giudice (1660–1743), protettore  degli Stati Austriaci
10:00 Dr. Antoinette Friedenthal (Freischaffende Kunsthistorikerin,
Potsdam): Ein Fall von Œuvremanie? Forschungsdesiderate zu Prinz Eugen von Savoyen und seiner Sammlung in der Albertina

Kaffeepause

Sektionsleitung: Dr. Johannes Nathan
(Nathan Fine Art, Potsdam und Zürich/ Technische Universität Berlin)
11:00 Mag. Stefanie Linsboth (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, IKM): Bilder der Kaiserin. Maria Theresias Porträt in Sammlungen des 18. Jahrhunderts
11:30 Prof. Dr. Ladislav Daniel (Palacky University Olomouc/Charles
University Prague): Collecting and cultural environment: a case study from Bohemia and Moravia
12:00 Mag. Gernot Mayer (Universität Wien): Sammeln nach Mode. Wiener Bilderkabinette des späten 18. Jahrhunderts

Mittagspause

Sektionsleitung:
Doz. Dr. Werner Telesko (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, IKM)
15:00 Dr. Anna Frasca-Rath (Universität Wien): Der Wert des Marmors. Preisgestaltung und Wertkriterien von Skulptur zwischen Rom und Wien
15:30 Dr. Gudrun Swoboda (Gemäldegalerie, Kunsthistorisches Museum,
Wien): #albani1800. Vom mehrmaligen Raub einer römischen Gemäldesammlung in napoleonischer Zeit
16:00 Prof. Dr. Sebastian Schütze (Universität Wien): Kunst, Kommerz und Kennerschaft im bürgerlichen Zeitalter: Die Gemäldesammlung des Franz Salzmann Edler von Bienenfeld

Kaffeepause

Sektionsleitung:
Christoph Hoffmann (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, ACDH)
17:00 Mag. Julia Santa-Reuckl (Museum für Angewandte Kunst, Wien): Zu Entstehung und Zerstreuung der Sammlung Friedrich Jakob Gsell
17:30 Dr. Roswitha Juffinger (Salzburg/Wien): Museologische Aspekte sammlungsgeschichtlicher Forschung am Beispiel der Gemäldesammlungen von Johann Rudolph Czernin (1757–1845)
und Erzherzog Ludwig Viktor (1842–1919)

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